Sense of Place Activities

Let’s make art about where we live with art educators Mary Helen Maskill and Grace Weaver!

Share your work of art with #wfmaartstories.


Wichita Falls 1882

Go back to the “Gilded Age” and imagine life in Wichita Falls by using your surroundings and favorite places. This is a “plein air” activity, meaning out of doors, led by MSU art education student Grace Weaver. Supplies can be anything you have on hand!

drawing of storm over mountains

Another Cloudy Day

Another cloudy Monday of quarantine…let’s draw it with Mary Helen Maskill, WFMA Community Engagement Manager! You’ll need crayons or color pencils and white paper of any kind.

Polly Cox, M Priddy Home, 1976, Watercolor, From the Permanent Collection of the Wichita Falls Museum of Art at MSU Texas

The Value of Place

As we ‘shelter in place’ we can discover the value of our place through art! 

Award winning watercolor artist from Wichita Falls, Polly Hoffman Cox (1921-2005), did just that, to identify and understand the culture of our area.

Image: Polly Cox, M Priddy Home, 1976, Watercolor; Gift of North Texas Federal Savings and Loan, 1987.

Mary Stephens, Trees

The Place in Which We Live

Today we meet another “sense of place” artist, Mary Stephens. Born and educated in Oklahoma, this quiet, astute artist learned from each of her life stages and represented them in her abstract art works.

Learn more about artist Mary Stephens and enjoy a “Sense of Place” Activity by Mary Helen Maskill.

Image: Mary Stephens, Trees, Mixed media

creepy crawlie art animal

Feel Closer to the Natural World

As the weather warms, we want the outdoors. Being outside inspires us to create art in the style of nationally known artist Andy Goldsworthy and get to know the art elements shape, line, color, and texture!

Spirit Dancers, 1986-87, acrylic on canvas

It is Never Too Late

Today, let’s look at art by cubist-inspired artist, Jeannette Heiberger, a heritage member of the Wichita Falls Art Association in our current exhibition, “Let Me Show You This!” Following the spirit of ‘it is never too late,’ Jeannette began seriously studying art in her mid 50s, producing her personal creative style for 39 more years.

Image: Spirit Dancers, 1986-87, acrylic on canvas; from the collection of Bill and Mary Helen Maskill.